Watch Tesla Model S Drive 125 MPH For Over An Hour

Someone told us EVs can’t drive at high speeds for more than a few minutes without issue …

There are still plenty of myths out there about electric vehicles. While some are truly false and have been since the beginning, others were actually true and still are true in some cases. One such criticism is that electric cars can’t travel at high speeds for extended periods of time without losing steam and eventually “overheating” and having to “rest.” This has been proven in Tesla vehicles in the past, but it seems the issue may have been resolved.

The Tesla Model 3 arrived and proved that an electric car can handle the drag strip and the track, hold its own even better than many expected, and not overheat. Electric car aficionado and Tesla fan Bjørn Nyland decided it was time once again to put the Tesla Model S to the test. More specifically, Nyland is in a Model S P100D with Ludicrous Plus mode. In order to prove that the car can handle high speeds and not overheat, he provides over one hour of footage. The car just keeps going on going and going.

Let us know what you think about this positive news in the comment section below.

Video Description via Bjørn Nyland on YouTube:

Model S P100DL driving 200 km/h, 125 mph over 1 hour

Special thanks to:
http://www.marcusbil.no/
https://www.megahjul.no/

TESLA MODEL S

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Source: Electric Vehicle News

Audi e-tron Offers Electrifying Dynamics, Unmatched AWD

The electric all-wheel drive is second to none, so says Audi.

As we all know, all-electric all-wheel-drive powertrains are the best and even leave state-of-the-art ICE powertrains far in the dust in terms of performance, precision and even driving pleasure.

Audi equipped its e-tron model with two electric motors – one per axle – and torque vectoring systems so that the overall driving experience on different terrain would receive very positive feedback.

“With driving dynamics tests on Namibia’s salt flats and savanna, the Audi e-tron prototype is at present impressively demonstrating its handling qualities. All made possible thanks to a new generation of the quattro drive – the electric all-wheel drive. In conjunction with the versatile suspension, its low center of gravity and the powerful electric motors, the electric SUV offers powerful traction, outstanding dynamics and unshakable stability on disparate terrain.”

Below you can find photos and videos from the demonstration on Namibia’s salt flats and savanna, as well as the manufacturer’s description of key points of the e-tron.

Audi e-tron specs:

  • 0-60 mph – 5.5 seconds
  • Top speed – 124 mph
  • over 400 km (250 miles) expected under WLTP test cycle
  • 95 kWh battery (36 cell modules, each module is equipped with 12 pouch cells, nominal voltage of 396 volts)
  • battery pack weight: 700 kilograms (1543.2 lb)
  • dual-motor all-wheel drive – up to 300 kW and 664 Nm in S mode (boost) or up to 265 kW and 561 Nm in D mode. Front motor is 135 kW, the rear is 165 kW (S mode).
  • Maximum tow rating – 4,000 pounds when properly equipped
  • 9.6 kW on-board charger (240 V, 40 A) in U.S. and 11 kW or 22 kW three-phase in Europe
  • DC fast charging up to 150 kW: 0-80% in 30 minutes
Audi e-tron prototype

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Press release:

Power play: Audi e-tron prototype with electrifying dynamics

  • New quattro generation: the electric all-wheel drive
  • Enormous driving pleasure: powerful traction on different terrain
  • Wide-ranging character: from long-distance tourer to offroad adventurer

With driving dynamics tests on Namibia’s salt flats and savanna, the Audi e-tron prototype is at present impressively demonstrating its handling qualities. All made possible thanks to a new generation of the quattro drive – the electric all-wheel drive. In conjunction with the versatile suspension, its low center of gravity and the powerful electric motors, the electric SUV offers powerful traction, outstanding dynamics and unshakable stability on disparate terrain.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Tesla Founder Elaborates On California’s Current Startup Grind

TESLA FOUNDER TALKS ABOUT THE ‘STARTUP GRIND’ IN SILICON VALLEY

Marc Tarpenning was already a veteran of the Silicon Valley startup scene when he and Martin Eberhard founded Tesla. Their skills in starting companies and securing financing were a big part of the reason that the company was able to get up and running so quickly. Tarpenning is also an articulate and engaging speaker, as I learned when I interviewed him for my history of Tesla. So who better to talk about startups than Tarpenning?

*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs.

Above: Tesla Founder, Marc Tarpenning (Image: @mtarpenning)

As Tarpenning recaps the fascinating story of his career in this new video from Startup Grind, he sheds light on the various experiences and revelations that led him to help create the company that is revolutionizing the world’s transportation and energy systems.

Tarpenning takes us back to the early days back in the 1960s, when he was one of the few people fooling around with computers. At Berkeley, he planned to get into the humanities, but kept coming back to computing. He was mainly interested in software, but in those days you had to know a lot about hardware, as the software was a lot “closer to the metal.” Tarpenning gradually came to specialize in firmware.

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Above: Tarpenning opens up about Tesla (Youtube: Startup Grind Local)

In his 20s, Tarpenning traveled the world as a computer consultant. He spent a lot of time in Saudi Arabia, an experience that impressed him with the need to break the world’s addiction to fossil fuels – not so much for environmental reasons (few were aware of climate change back then), but for economic and cultural reasons. When he returned to the Valley in the mid-1990s, he dove into disk drives. Creating the software that makes disk drives work turned out to be an invaluable lesson in how to make systems that are super-reliable.

Soon Tarpenning had his fateful meeting with Martin Eberhard. The two engineers looked for something “fun” to get into, and decided on digital books. They formed a company that created one of the first e-readers, and learned how software can change a long-established business ecosystem – to wit, the publishing industry, which has been around for a millennium or two. “We discovered that these ancient industries can be disrupted pretty easily.”

Above: The San Francisco director of Startup Grind, Michael Gasiorek, sits down with Marc Tarpenning (Twitter: Joanna Bell

Tarpenning tells how he reached other key insights that Tesla was built on, including the central importance of the customer experience. Instead of reinventing the battery, Tesla would use proven, readily available cylindrical cells like the ones used in laptops (which were already being produced in the billions per year). Of course, the big revelation, which led to the development of the Tesla Roadster, was that trying to sell an electric car as a money-saver was a dead end. EVs had to be sold on the basis of their superior driving performance – in short, they had to be cool.

As long-time followers of Tesla understand (but many in the mainstream press obviously do not), the company was built on a three-phase strategy, one that’s common in the software industry: first you produce a high-end niche product that commands a premium price; next you use the lessons learned from that to produce a mid-market product at higher volume; and finally you use the skills, economies of scale and cost reductions gained in the previous steps to build the mass-market product that is the ultimate goal.

Above: Tarpenning and Eberhard with the Tesla Roadster (Image: Astrum People)

How has Tesla executed that plan? “It’s been amazing,” says Tarpenning. “Elon has, as we know at the moment, some foibles, but he has really pushed the company faster and further than we really imagined. What has also been astonishing is how slow the big incumbents have been at catching up. They’re now just beginning, maybe – they swear this next year, maybe the year after, they’re going to have some EVs that really work, and it’s going to be great.”

Back in 2004, the Tesla founders assumed that when the Roadster came out and showed people what was possible with an EV, Big Auto would jump into the market – perhaps one of the global giants would acquire Tesla, or perhaps they would produce their own competing electric sedans. The Tesla board spent a lot of time worrying about how the little startup would be able to deal with competition from the global giants. They never considered the possibility that the “big boys” would basically do nothing.

Above: Tesla’s Model 3 has now gone ‘Pac-Man’ on the entire mid-size luxury sedan market* (Source: Reddit / Lord Zeekos via Twitter / Walter MacVane)

The legacy automakers’ inaction gave Tesla years of additional time to develop its products. Ten years after the release of the Roadster, the legacy carmakers are still watching and waiting, as Tesla’s vehicles eat into their markets like Pac-Man.

Worried about the future of Tesla, or of EVs in general? Watch the last five minutes of this video (actually, it’s well worth watching the whole thing). Tarpenning explains why he thinks electrification will happen much faster than most people think and offers some insight into Tesla’s secret weapon: a mission. “With Tesla, it was so much easier to recruit people. [People would say] ‘I so want to work here, because I want to work on something that actually has meaning, and I’m willing to take a pay cut.’ That happened over and over.”

===

Written by: Charles Morris; Source: Startup Grind Local; *Chart sourced from US sales data via Good Car Bad Car for September 2018 (Note: Tesla doesn’t break out sales by country, and the Model 3 tally assumes some deliveries to customers in Canada)

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

WEBINAR: State-of-the-art electric drive testing and the components for advanced power analysis

HBM eDrive is a system for testing electrical inverters and electrical machines. Mechanical signals (e.g., torque) and electrical signals (current, voltage) are acquired simultaneously, helping to better understand the electric drive and its losses in minutes. This is important for the optimization of the drive as well as the increase in efficiency.

In contrast to conventional power analyzers, HBM eDrive Testing acts as both a power analyzer and data acquisition system. It has the ability to record all signals along the drive train (power source, inverter, torque and speed of a motor, temperatures, CAN signals, strain, vibration, etc.) with a single instrument. This greatly reduces the test complexity and results in synchronous measurement of all parameters.

Register for HBM’s free webinar – hosted by Charged on November 28, 2018, 2:00 PM EDT – to learn more about:

  • Limitations of Current Test Systems
  • Actuator motor testing overview
  • Current motor testing limitations
  • State of the art technical requirements
  • Testing of an electromechanical system involving pressure, displacement, flow and temp
  • Dynamic efficiency testing
  • Dynamic control analysis
  • Large system testing with many motors and converters
  • Failure and fault analysis for motors
  • Real-time test system feedback

 

Register now – it’s free!

 


Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine

British Electric Invasion: Zapp’s High-Performance E-Scooter

Performance and scooter can go hand in hand

The future of electric scooters lies in performance? The beauty of an electric powertrain is that you can get a lot of juice without having a big engine, and accelerations are insanely fun. While most scooters promote their cleanliness and absence of emissions, new Brit startup Zapp is instead promoting a high-performance electric scooter.

Zapp is a brand-new UK-based company that will launch its very first model, the i300 in November. In order to give a sense of what to expect, the company unveiled a teaser video of its first product that highlights certain of its features.

The most striking one is undeniably the z-shaped frame of the scooter. The i300 will be built on a motorsport-inspired lightweight aluminum structure. At the front, a quirky-shaped windshield that reminds me of a Star Wars battle droid head is decorated with a honeycomb pattern repeated on the footrest.

According to the designs used in the trailer, the scooter will sport a red front fairing with matching red front fork and coil spring suspension that will contrast the black ensemble nicely. Distribution of the power will be provided by what looks like a timing belt, meaning the motor isn’t directly propelling the back wheel like in some electric scooters and bikes.

Power is expected to be comparable to that of a 300cc scooter. Because range remains one of the major roadblocks to the development of the electric bike market, Zapp promises the i300 will have a competitive range to offer, stating that “range anxiety is a thing of the past.” The compact battery will also be easy to carry along for easy charging wherever you have to be.

A digital display is integrated into the handlebar and shows a series of buttons that will allow the future user to navigate the onboard computer, including turning “regen” on and off (regenerative braking maybe?). We don’t have a clear date for the model’s unveil; all we know for sure is that the Zapp i300 is “coming soon.”

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Source: Electric Vehicle News

Bosch To Launch Electric Van Sharing In Germany

Bosch will launch a van sharing business in Germany

After launching Coup rental service, which operates 3,500 electric scooters in Berlin, Paris, and Madrid, Bosch is now preparing an electric van sharing system in Germany.

Bosch partners with toom, a subsidiary of the German retail group Rewe, that has more than 330 hardware stores. The idea is to offer small delivery vans at toom stores, that would enable customers to carry heavy and bulky purchases back home.

The service will be launched in December 2018 at five stores in five cities (Berlin, Frankfurt, Leipzig, Troisdorf, and Freiburg).

Bosch decided to use StreetScooter electric vans produced and used in volume by Deutsche Post DHL (it’s worth noting that Bosch is the supplier of the powertrain for StreetScooter). Those vehicles will be rented simply by using an app. Each store will also have charging infrastructure to handle the fleet and since each vehicle will back returned back to the store, van sharing makes perfect sense.

In Germany, already 2 million people are using some kind of vehicle sharing services and 1/10 of the fleet is electric.

Press blast:

Bosch enters the car-sharing business with electric vans

Quickly renting a car by app is something that nearly two million people already do in Germany alone, and the number of car-sharing users is on the rise

Streetscooter

Quickly renting a car by app is something that nearly two million people already do in Germany alone, and the number of car-sharing users is on the rise. In this growth market, Bosch is launching a new sharing service for electric vans. Together with toom, a subsidiary of the German retail group Rewe, the company will be testing the service at hardware stores, which is precisely where there is a demand for vans with sufficient space to carry heavy and bulky purchases. “Bosch is growing with digital services for urban mobility. A service for sharing electric vans has huge potential for growth,” says Dr. Rainer Kallenbach, president of the Connected Mobility Solutions division at Bosch. With more than 330 stores, toom is one of the top providers in the German home-improvement industry. From December 2018, it will only take a few clicks for customers at five selected stores to directly book an electric van on site, and quickly and simply take stone slabs, balcony plants, and paint pots home with them. “As a company committed to sustainability, we are always eager to constantly improve our contribution to environmental protection. We’re therefore very pleased that we can now offer our customers an eco-friendly way of taking their purchases home,” says Wolfgang Vogt, toom’s managing director for finance and personnel. Bosch is already well versed in the sharing services business, as demonstrated by Coup, its rental service for electric scooters. Since its launch in 2016, Coup has constantly expanded, and now has a fleet of 3,500 scooters in Berlin, Paris, and Madrid.

Electric fleet for hire

In Germany, one in every ten shared cars now has an electric motor. In its Coup and van-sharing schemes, Bosch has opted exclusively for electrically powered vehicles. “Fully electric driving is ideal for urban mobility – whether that means downtown delivery traffic or individual mobility in major cities,” Kallenbach says. The van-sharing service will initially be offered in Germany, at hardware stores in Berlin, Frankfurt, Leipzig, Troisdorf, and Freiburg. At these stores, charge spots are already in place for the small electric vans, which are provided by StreetScooter. Bosch supplies the powertrain components for these vehicles. The company believes that shared electric vans have scope for application outside the hardware-store sector: if the new sharing service proves popular, Bosch plans to expand it to include other partners, whether these be other toom stores, furniture stores, supermarkets, or electronics stores.

Say goodbye to shopping stress

Car sharing has long ceased to be a niche market, as indicated by the sector’s rapid growth: by 2025, the market is projected to have as many as 36 million users worldwide (source: Frost & Sullivan). More and more users, especially in big cities, are taking advantage of app-based services to reserve a vehicle at any time, day or night, then climb right in and drive off. Large and bulky purchases rarely fit into the backpack a shopper might use when traveling through the city on a rented scooter or bike. Anyone who finds themselves needing a way to transport their hardware-store purchases can use the new service to reserve a roomy electric van, either a few hours in advance or at the last minute when making the purchase. Vans can be returned to the same station that the shopper picked them up from. The great advantage here is that users pay a flat hourly rate that includes mileage and battery recharging, an arrangement that is often less expensive than the classic car rental. In addition, the entire process from rental to return is completely digital – with no tedious paperwork.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Tesla Registers Over 9,000 New Model 3 VINs

Tesla registered its biggest batch of Model 3 VINs ever

New VINs for the Tesla Model 3 are registered almost on a daily basis in batches from a few to thousands of units. The latest one was the biggest so far – 9,426 (52% were AWD).

The total number of Model 3 VINs registered now stands at 148,386, which means that the latest group represents over 6.3% of the total. As cumulative production is estimated at around 100,000, Tesla has some 48,000 VINs ready (enough for two months at 5,000 a week).

The cumulative number of VINs for all-wheel drive versions of the Model 3 stands at around 65,000 and soon will exceed rear-wheel drive versions (over 82,000 registered).

Source: Model 3 VINs


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Audi e-tron All-Wheel Drive Capabilities Tested: Video

Audi e-tron passed the desert test.

Autogefühl recently had the opportunity to test drive the Audi e-tron prototype (with a production version of the powertrain) at Namibia’s salt flats and savanna.

Tests were focused on driving dynamics and the all-wheel-drive capabilities in different driving modes. As it turns out, the all-new e-tron is the most agile car of its size, according to Autogefühl.

The Audi e-tron seems very stable, without much wheel spin. Has quick response from its motors, an impressive driving experience and is very stiff and quiet.

In the night driving part, everything was positive too, although cameras and displays are probably not as accurate as standard mirrors.

The exterior and interior overview of the production model in the studio revealed strong build quality, intuitive infotainment with a clean, open design of the cockpit, similar to other Audi models.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Tesla has grown to 45,000 employees despite laying off ~4,000 people earlier this year

Despite laying off about 9 percent of its staff earlier this year, Tesla has already grown to 45,000 employees, according to CEO Elon Musk.

It would mean that Tesla has now a higher headcount than before the layoffs. more…

The post Tesla has grown to 45,000 employees despite laying off ~4,000 people earlier this year appeared first on Electrek.


Source: Charge Forward

Road Test: 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD

Toyota’s Top Seller Goes A Little Edgy

When you see a Toyota RAV4 on the freeway, do you ever think about it as an off-road beast? As Toyota’s best-selling vehicle, it is pretty much assured that nearly all RAV4 owners are not thinking of getting the bottom of their crossover dirty. So, to throw a wrench in it, Toyota thought offering the edgier Adventure version might get a few folks to release their wild(er) side just a bit.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure

It’s got the looks–and hardware–to go off-road

Drivetrain

The 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD is powered by a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine putting out 176 horsepower and 172 pound-feet of torque through an electronically-controlled six-speed automatic transmission. This drivetrain combination is EPA rated at 22 mpg city/28 highway/25 combined. Since Clean Fleet Report feels all AWD cars should set a 30-mpg goal in some mode (city or highway), we took the challenge to see what could be achieved with judicious driving. In 260 miles of 75-percent highway/25-percent city driving, we averaged 24.7 mpg.

However, in a 175-mile freeway run, with the Dynamic Smart Cruise Control set at 65 mph and in Eco drive mode, we got close to our goal, but never better than 29.3 mpg. Being realistic, most RAV4 owners will be closer to the EPA estimates under normal driving conditions. If fully loaded with four adults and their gear for a weekend ski trip, fuel economy and performance might suffer when climbing mountains to the resort.

Driving Experience: On the Road

Our 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD was quiet and delivered a pleasant ride on the freeway. In town or when climbing a grade, the transmission was never hunting for the right gear as it was well-matched with the 2.5-liter engine. Acceleration was so-so, with 0-60 mph runs taking about 8.5 seconds using the driver-selectable Sport drive mode. Handling for the 3,605-pound RAV4 was good, but not nimble. Maybe the extra four inches of ride height over the base RAV4 or the extra weight from the standard tow package (tow rating up-to 3,500 pounds) made the Adventure more of a straight-line cruiser than a cornering standout. Overall, the RAV4 Adventure AWD is an easy and comfortable crossover, if not an exciting one.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Advanture

Aggressive–for a Toyota

Since this is Toyota’s off-road version of the RAV4, we found some loose dirt, shale and gravel, on about a 15-percent grade, and had no problem getting traction. The 18-inch, 235/55 all-season tires, with traction and dynamic torque control, did their job well. Probably any more severe off-pavement surfaces should be left to other Toyota AWD trucks and SUVs.

Stops were solid and consistent with a power-assisted braking system consisting of vented front and solid rear discs, anti-lock brake system and electronic brake-force distribution. The latter adjusts brake proportioning to compensate for added weight from passengers or cargo, and even adjusts as fuel is consumed. This is invisible and instant to the driver and passengers, making for a comfortable and controlled ride.

Driving Experience: Exterior

The 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD has the same body design as the standard model. Adventure-only adornments include a black hood stripe, fender extensions and blacked-out grill, mirrors and roof rails. With the black, 10-spoke wheels, and the optional ($395) striking Ruby Flare Pearl paint, this is one sharp-looking RAV4.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Advanture

A beefier suspension boosts ride height and off-road clearance

Driving Experience: Interior

The RAV4 Adventure dash layout was simple, with straight-forward gauges and controls that are within easy reach of the driver. We are big fans of knobs and switches for the radio and climate controls, and Toyota did not disappoint in this area. There is a combination of hard and soft plastic on the dash and door panel surfaces, a leather-wrapped shift knob, all-weather RAV4 Adventure-logoed rubber floor mats, and logoed door sill protectors. Seating for three in the rear offered ample head and leg room. The rear seats reclining a few inches from upright is a nice touch. If you want a Toyota with a third row, you should check-out the Highlander SUV.

Toyota describes the RAV4 interior as a “cavernous cabin,” a statement we can mostly get behind. Our RAV4 interior had sturdy fabric seat coverings for the manual adjustable driver and passenger seats. Add-in a tilt and telescopic steering column, and it was easy finding a comfortable driving position. We also liked the center armrest’s correct height and large storage area, as well as the eight cup holders throughout the cabin.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Advanture

The dash is classic Toyota, with some new tech

Audio and telephone controls, mounted on the leather-wrapped steering wheel, operated the Entune Premium Audio system. The 7.0-inch touchscreen color display handled navigation, the backup camera, SiriusXM (three-month trial subscription), AM/FM/HD/CD/MP3 driving six speakers, USB port with iPod connectivity, Aux-in jacks, advanced voice recognition, Bluetooth streaming audio and hands-free telephone. The Entune bundle includes a wide array of apps and other audio features.

Storage is ample with the rear seat up, but expands when the 60/40 rear seat is folded flat. Access to the storage area, with a convenient low lift-over load height and a 120V/110W power outlet, is through a power foot operated liftgate. A rubber floor mat with raised sides is also found in the cargo area.

Other nice interior features are a dual zone climate control system, power windows and door locks, power and heated outside mirrors, power moonroof, rear shelf cover, exterior temperature display, remote keyless entry system, day/night rearview mirror and three 12-volt accessory outlets.

Safety

The 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure comes with standard and optional safety features, including eight air bags, pre-collision with pedestrian detection, front and rear parking sonar, hill start assist, lane departure warning, blind spot monitor, rear traffic alert, back-up warning, tire pressure monitoring system, smart cruise control and electronic stability control.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Advanture

The RAV4 Adventure will get you there in style at almost 30 mpg

The 2018 Toyota RAV4 has earned a US Government National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 5-Star Overall Vehicle Score, where 5 Stars is its highest safety rating.

Pricing and Warranties

The non-hybrid 2018 Toyota RAV4 models range in base price from $24,660 to $36,400, depending on the drive system and trim level. Clean Fleet Report’s 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD, had a MSRP of $31,139, which included $3,679 in options. All prices are before the $995 processing and handling fee.

The 2018 Toyota RAV4 comes with these warranties:

  • Powertrain                    Five years/60,000 miles
  • Comprehensive            Three years/36,000 miles
  • Maintenance Plan        Two years/25,000 miles
  • Anti-perforation           Five year/Unlimited miles
  • Roadside Assistance    Two years/25,000 miles

Observations: 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure AWD

With ample room for passengers and their cargo, the 2018 Toyota RAV4 Adventure doubles as a good family crossover and, with the mild ruggedness upgrades, a mild off-roader. The RAV4 Adventure benefits from Toyota’s solid, well-known build quality and safety record, so families can travel with confidence.

2018 Toyota RAV4 Advanture

The Adventure has a variety of options to customize the mild off-roader

With nine trim levels, there should be a RAV4 model for everyone in the market for a small crossover. And if you are looking for higher fuel economy, check-out the RAV4 hybrid. With nearly half a million units sold in 2017, you will be in good company owning a RAV4.

Whatever you buy, Happy Driving!

[See image gallery at www.cleanfleetreport.com]

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Disclosure:

Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition, we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.

Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.

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Source: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicles