2019 Harley-Davidson LiveWire: Everything We Know

We finally have the full portrait.

Five years in the making and we finally get to know (pretty much) everything there is to know about Harley-Davidson‘s first step into electrification: the LiveWire.

The manufacturer announced it would start working on its very first electric motorcycle over 5 years ago. Already at the time, the company had expressed the desire to diversify its audience. In 2014, the then dubbed “Project LiveWire” prototype started touring Harley dealers and motorcycle shows to get feedback and impressions from the public. Then, we waited. And waited.

Springs Back To Life

For a few years, the project was almost completely forgotten and while it had created much hype back when it was first announced, the LiveWire became a bit of a Loch Monster: some people say they have seen it but nobody has proven its existence. Finally, as 2108 rolled in, H-D looked about ready for the commitment. With the promise of an official launch in 2019, the company started name-dropping the LiveWire once more.

The design has remained virtually the same as the Project LiveWire prototype, except for the addition of a front cowl. The new design introduces a much more modern aesthetic to the century-old company’s lineup. The bike is built on a lightweight aluminum chassis. The exposed frame, floating upward tail, and naked silhouette are a stark contrast from the typical Harley—exactly what the company is aiming to do with what it hopes will help kindle a younger audience’s curiosity. The electric powertrain is set low within the frame to send the weight towards the ground and keep a low center of gravity.

The company opted for a stiffer chassis to make the ride more engaging and responsive. The LiveWire comes fitted with Brembo front brakes, ABS, and traction control. Riders will have the choice of 7 different riding modes to adapt to their needs.

2019 Harley-Davidson LiveWire

Electric Feature

A new feature, alien to the rest of the lineup, is the “twist and go. Since its electric, the LiveWire neither has a clutch nor a gear selector. You only have to, well, twist and go. The company has also been selling the model’s performance, with the promise of a 0-to-60 in 3.5 seconds thanks to its electric powertrain. You can have all the range anxiety in the world: you have to admit that electric vehicles offer entertaining take offs.

The bike will also be connected via the H-D connect. This provides the owner with such useful information as battery status, parking location, service reminders, and even a tracker should the motorcycle get stolen.

CES Reveal

At CES 2019, the company finally completed the portrait it started painting 5 years ago. It unveiled the numbers everyone had been begging to know: range and pricing. Powered by Harley’s Revelation powertrain, the 2019 LiveWire will provide users with an estimated 110-mile range in the city.

Charging times are listed by Harley as follow:

  • Level 1 (standard household outlet): 13 miles range per hour of charged.
  • Level 2: LiveWire can be connected to a Level 2 charge unit but will be charged at the Level 1 rate.
  • DC Fast Charge: 192 miles range per hour charged.

In common language, this means a full charge will take between 8 and 9 hours on a standard outlet. Less than an hour on a fast charger.

As for pricing, the tag has been set at $29,799. The model will be available in three colors starting August 2019.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Let’s Look At CATL’s Numerous Battery Deals

Mega-player in the battery biz.

Chinese power battery manufacturer Contemporary Amperex Technology Limited (CATL) and Zhejiang Jirun Automobile Company Limited (Zhejiang Jirun), a subsidiary held by Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, struck a deal on December 20, 2018 to fund a joint venture (JV) that works on the R&D, manufacture and sale of battery cells and battery packs. CATL will hold the majority share of the JV with 51 percent.

CATL Geely JV, CATL China OEM cooperation, CATL GAC JV, China automotive news

Aside from Geely, CATL also agreed cooperation agreements with other automakers like SAIC Motor, Dongfeng Motor, GAC Group and Jiangling Motors, etc., making it the China-based power battery maker who has most joint ventures with OEMs.

CATL Geely JV, CATL China OEM cooperation, CATL GAC JV, China automotive news

SAIC Motor was the first one that set up joint ventures with CATL. They established two companies in 2017: CATL-SAIC Motor Power Battery Co.,Ltd to develop, produce and sell lithium ion batteries (with a registered capital of RMB 2 billion); the other dubbed SAIC Motor-CATL Power Battery System Co.,Ltd to develop, produce and sell battery systems (with a registered capital of RMB 300million).

CATL Geely JV, CATL China OEM cooperation, CATL GAC JV, China automotive news

On July 4, 2018, a 50/50 joint venture between Dongfeng Motor and CATL dubbed Dongfeng-CATL (Wuhan) Battery System Co.,Ltd was put into operation. With a registered capital of RMB100 million, the JV specializes in developing, producing and selling NEV power batteries. Reportedly, it will complete the construction of three production lines in 2019 and is expected to produce 192,000 sets of battery systems and total capacity of 9.6GWh on an annual basis and generate RMB11.4 billion of yearly output value by 2020.

CATL Geely JV, CATL China OEM cooperation, CATL GAC JV, China automotive news

During the same month, CATL and GAC Group reached an agreement to build two joint ventures dubbed CATL-GAC Power Battery Co.,Ltd and GAC-CATL Power Battery System Co.,Ltd, focusing on producing battery cells and supplying battery systems respectively. The foundation stone-laying ceremony of the JV’s production base took place on December 23 and base is predicted to be put into operation next year.

Apart from building JVs with domestic carmaker, CATL also formed partnerships with Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW Brilliance last year to supply them with power batteries.

We can learn from the cases mentioned above that CATL is really a popular collaborator whom OEMs intend to work with. As mainstream automakers are flocking into the NEV domain, power battery is crucial and essential for companies to develop NEVs. However, independent R&D of batteries involves extremely high costs and multiple technology barriers. Thus, teaming up with battery makers is a good option for OEMs to ensure quality and control costs. Additionally, the cooperation with CATL will be an attractive point for company’s brand promotion by virtue of its “celebrity” feature in China’s NEV battery industry.

Public data shows that CATL has been constantly holding the championship by monthly installed battery capacity with 1.47GWh, 2.45GWh, 2.49GWh and 3.4GWh produced respectively from August to November in 2018.

Source: Gasgoo


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Redline Reviews Checks Out Nissan LEAF e+ At CES: Video

The world would look different if the e+ was ready two years ago.

Redline Reviews was one of the first who took a look on the new Nissan LEAF e+ at CES.

The Japanese electric flagship received a 62 kWh battery for up to 364 km (226 miles) of expected EPA range. Additionally, it gets a 160 kW electric motor and increased charging power to 70 kW (100 kW peak).

The main change inside is the bigger infotainment screen (8-inch) and newer software. Redline Reviews noticed also that the floor seems to be raised a little bit because of the new battery.

Nissan LEAF e+ specs (vs. LEAF 40 kWh)

  • 62 kWh battery (+55% capacity over 40 kWh, 25% more energy dense lithium-ion cells, similar size)
  • 288 lithium-ion cells (vs. compared to 192 cells)
  • battery limited warranty of 8 years/160,000 km (whichever occurs first) is standard
  • 364 km (226 miles) of expected EPA range (up 50% from 243 km/151 miles)
  • 385 km (239 miles) of WLTP range in Europe (vs. 285 km/177 miles)
  • 458 km (285 miles) of WLTC Japan range in Japan (vs. 322 km/200 miles)
  • 570 km (354 miles) of JC08 range in Japan (vs. 400 km/249 miles)
  • 160 kW electric motor (up from 110 kW) and 250 lb-ft (340 Nm) (vs. 320 Nm in 40 kWh version)
  • 70 kW (100 kW peak) fast charging using CHAdeMO (vs. less than 50 kW)
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The neavw 2019 Nissan LEAF e+ has a 62 kWh battery pack and an EPA-estimated range of up to 226 miles. Sales in the U.S. are expected to begin in spring 2019.
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A short video was released also by Roadshow:

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Source: Electric Vehicle News

Seamless EV Charging Is Catching On In North America

NORTH AMERICAN CHARGING NETWORKS MOVE TO ENABLE SEAMLESS ROAMING FOR EV CHARGING

Electric vehicles are often compared to mobile phones. Among other similarities, both devices depend on a stack of interdependent hardware, software and services, and both need to be plugged in and charged after use, normally in the evening.

*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs.

Above: A Tesla Model X does some public charging at a Greenlots charging point in Ohio (Source: Greenlots)

A critical step in creating today’s mobile phone ecosystem was the development of roaming – a seamless handover from one service provider to another, invisible to the consumer. An analogous system is gradually coming into existence to handle EV charging. Public chargers are operated by a patchwork of operators around the world, and drivers need to be able to use the nearest and most convenient charging stations, without worrying about setting up multiple accounts or carrying around multiple access cards.

Two of North America’s largest charging networks, Greenlots and ChargePoint, recently formed a roaming partnership that will enable charging across both networks. Beginning in mid-2019, customers will be able to charge on either the ChargePoint or Greenlots networks without the need to create separate accounts or pay additional fees, enabling a seamless charging experience. Drivers will be able to use the Greenlots or ChargePoint mobile applications to locate charging stations, activate charging sessions, and pay for charging.

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Above: A look at how Chargepoint is becoming an integral part of workplace charging at forward-thinking companies like Adobe (Youtube: Chargepoint)

The new roaming agreement is based on the Open Charge Point Interface (OCPI), part of an open application protocol that allows charging stations and central management systems from different vendors to communicate with each other – in much the same way that cell phone networks do.

“This once-fragmented industry is building momentum towards true driver interoperability thanks to adoption of standards like OCPI that are beneficial to drivers, automakers, grid operators and charging infrastructure providers,” said Lin-Zhuang Khoo, Senior VP, Greenlots. “What’s particularly encouraging about this positive trend is that it is happening in advance of major policy changes or other external forces – a sign that the EV charging market is maturing in concert with surging customer demand for EVs.”

Above: Fiat 500e and Tesla Model S using Chargepoint (Source: Steve Goes Green)

“For more than a decade, ChargePoint has worked to create an open and accessible network that enables drivers to enjoy an effortless charging experience,” said Michael Hughes, Chief Commercial and Revenue Officer of ChargePoint. “We invite other networks to join us in similar partnerships as we seek to make EV charging ubiquitous.”

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Written by: Charles Morris; This article originally appeared in Charged; Sources: GreenlotsChargePoint

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Da Costa Takes Blame For BMW On BMW Crash In Formula E

Antonio Felix da Costa blames himself for the clash between the BMW Andretti team-mates in the ABB FIA Formula E Marrakesh E-Prix, and reckons his teammate Alexander Sims could have won the race.

As the BMW cars ran 1-2, Sims mounted an assault for the lead towards the end of a race that da Costa had led after passing early leader and pole-winner Sam Bird. But the pair locked up going into Turn 7 left-hander and then collided as da Costa – who won the opening round in Saudi Arabia – ran straight on.

He ended up in the barriers and was out of the race, which handed the lead to Mahindra’s Jerome d’Ambrosio, who went on to win, while Sims recovered from the fracas to salvage fourth place.

When asked about the incident by Motorsport.com, da Costa accepted the blame for the incident, which he said “denied the team a win”.

“I’m sorry – that’s a mistake and a mistake coming from me only,” he continued. “[It’s] terribly frustrating in this story because we lost a win, we lost a one-two, and even if it was just me, Alex could have won the race.

“But because of that, I denied him the win, denied the team a one-two. I’m feeling very bad for myself.”

Da Costa also conceded that Sims was the quicker of the two drivers on the day, and felt that he should have yielded the lead.

“He was [quicker] today, yeah, especially at that point,” he said. “In the last 15 laps he was building an edge on me, he had more pace than me.

“I should have accepted that and let him go. I didn’t. The outcome is a combination of many situations that happened in the 40 minutes that we raced.

“When [it] happened, I wanted to find the deepest hole in Marrakesh and put myself in it.”

Sims said “we all take responsibility for it” and suggested that BMW could have communicated more effectively together.

“We all need to learn and work together,” he explained to Motorsport.com. “At that point, I think I had more energy than Antonio by a decent amount, but I just didn’t communicate my feelings with the team well enough.

“Antonio and I get on, it’s not like there’s a breakdown in our relationship and we’re good friends, and we didn’t want this situation to happen obviously. But we’ll learn from it and move on.”

Both drivers reckoned BMW could have considered employing team orders in a bid to preserve the leading positions.

“Why that situation happened, I’ll talk about it with the team later – I would not have minded a team order to tell me to let him go,” said da Costa. “I would not have enjoyed [that], but I think that would have been the thing to do. Again, we will talk internally now and go from there.

“We’re a team, we’re very strong together and I normally put my hand up for mistakes, so I’m putting my hand up for my bit.”

Sims added: “I think there probably would have been [team orders]. That’s something we need to learn.”


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Nissan e-POWER A Huge Sales Success: Why Not Add a Plug?

Nissan e-POWER beat Toyota’s hybrids in Japan

Nissan celebrates a tremendous achievement of selling 136,324 Note cars in Japan last year, which put the model on the top of all models, ahead of Toyota Aqua (126,561), Toyota Prius (115,462) and Nissan Serena minivan (99,865). For comparison, the Nissan LEAF was #35 at 25,722.

We would normally not bother, but both Nissans – Note and Serena – are offered in conventional and a special, series-hybrid version called e-POWER (without plug-in capability).

As it turns out, 70% of all Note sales in 2018 were Note e-Power, which would translate to over 95,000. Since the introduction of Note e-POWER in November 2016, Nissan already sold over 200,000 of those!

The Nissan Note e-POWER shares its electric drivetrain with the all-electric Nissan LEAF and we believe the battery modules are also similar (just a few of them and higher-power versions). e-POWER hybrids alway drive using the electric motor, while the engine/generator only generates electricity.

“The system features an electric drivetrain with a battery that’s charged by a gasoline engine. Because the wheels are driven solely by an electric motor, e-POWER models offer the same smooth, instant acceleration and agile performance as a pure electric vehicle. The gasoline engine, used only to charge the battery, runs at an optimal speed at all times for maximum fuel efficiency.”

Achieving the best sales results among passenger cars and minivans prompts us to ask a question, whether it wouldn’t be worth adding a bigger battery and plug-in capability for a few more grand, as results clearly show that consumers want to drive electric.

The mainstream plug-in hybrid with series-hybrid drivetrain is not a filled up segment outside Japan. The investment costs to introduce e-POWER versions seems minor and in some cases, like with the pickup trucks, it could be a very good idea until BEVs become more popular.

More Nissan e-POWER coming according to Nissan Senior Vice President Asako Hoshino:

“Nissan’s technologies are giving our customers a safer, more enjoyable and more convenient driving experience. You can expect even more to come.”

The Nissan Serena e-POWER Highway STAR V


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Master Puzzle Maker: Tesla Put All The Pieces Together

MASTER PUZZLE MAKER SAYS TESLA PUTS ALL THE PIECES TOGETHER

Recently I met George Miller, a world-renowned puzzle maker. George makes 2D- and 3D-puzzle prototypes and builds hundreds of high quality puzzles each year, including classic puzzle reproductions, new puzzle designs, and ultra-modern puzzle creations. It turns out both George and his wife Roxanne are Tesla enthusiasts.

*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Barbara Pressman. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs.

Above: George prototyping for a new puzzle (Image: EVANNEX)

George’s interest in Tesla began with his first Roadster, VIN #1050. His first wife wanted a sports car but George rejected the usual internal combustion engine options. On a lark, both George and his wife took a test drive in a Roadster. Both exited the Roadster wearing the famous Tesla smile. Decision made!

Now on his third Tesla, George and Roxanne just took delivery of a Model S P100D and have the next generation 2020 Roadster on order.

Above: George and Roxanne with their new Model S (Image: EVANNEX)

George refers to himself as a “puzzle prototyper,” and every year in his shop, Puzzle Palace, he makes about 100 puzzles for the International Puzzle Party held in the US, Europe, and Japan annually on a rotating basis. I asked him if his unique way of thinking drew him to Tesla.

Above: George owns over 3,000 interlocking puzzles (Image: EVANNEX)

George smiled and thought for a moment. “Puzzle solvers (and makers) must have logical minds and the ability to make good decisions. Buying a Tesla was the perfect solution to my car buying puzzle.”

“In his own way, Elon Musk is a puzzle solver,” George continued. “Whether it’s an automotive design problem, a manufacturing problem, or thinking outside the box, Elon shines.”

Above: Puzzle Man (Image: EVANNEX)

A few years back, George was interviewed for his thoughts on the 80’s puzzle phenomenon that took the world by storm, the iconic Rubik’s Cube. “If it’s too small, it’s bad . . . If it’s too large, it’s bad,” he told the New York Post . “You want something that fits in your hand.”

I decided to ask George about the parallels of designing successful puzzles and the challenges of designing a smaller electric sedan with mass appeal.

George liked the metaphor. “Well, all of the pieces have to fit together. The problem is that you can try to fit the pieces in ways that don’t solve the puzzle. At first, the Tesla team struggled, but they figured it out.“

George explained that Tesla solved a puzzle that had eluded other automotive manufacturers. They made the pieces fit together with the introduction of Model 3. The Silicon Valley company brought to market a wildly popular, lower-priced, zero emissions vehicle.

Above: Fine tuning the edges for a perfect fit (Image: EVANNEX)

He continued, “Tesla is the perfect car for the future and the modularity makes it cost effective. Satellites are already in place for software updates worldwide—anywhere, anytime. We are almost at the tipping point for self-driving cars, and Tesla is leading the way.”

The Millers just returned from a road trip to visit family in the Chicago area. The trip began in South Florida. Here are some of George’s observations:

Autopilot was great, and we used it almost the whole way, even on smaller roads. The only stops were for charging and eating at the same time. Even the small town of Peru, IL had six superchargers.

Hotels with destination charging are key for an EV trip. We liked the Hilton chain. These chargers are a win-win for both hotels and Tesla.

Storage area in the trunk and frunk proved to be very helpful. We transported Christmas presents on the way there, and the puzzle collection on the way home.

Top: Trunk filled with Christmas presents for family visit; Bottom: Coming home the trunk would be filled with puzzles from George’s collection (Image: EVANNEX)

Charging stations were everywhere. We stretched the limit to about every four hours for stops.

Bluetooth connection was solid all along. We were able to listen to audio books during our trip (including the Elon Musk biography by Ashlee Vance).

Above: George enjoys driving his Tesla Model S on road trips (Image: EVANNEX)

George and Roxanne Miller are the kind of people who exemplify the Tesla owner. Their adventurous spirit, and logical, intelligent minds, make this car the pinnacle of these puzzle makers’ automotive dreams.

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Nissan LEAF Sales In Japan Increased 52% In 2018

In 2019, Nissan LEAF probably will break into the top 30 sales chart in Japan

The sales of the Nissan LEAF in Japan collapsed in December by 80% to just 455, but it’s all normal – seen several times – in the month preceding the introduction of a new version. This time we are waiting for the Nissan LEAF e+ in January.

The year 2018 was great for the LEAF in Japan as sales increased by 52% to an all-time record of 25,722, which was enough to take #35 in the overall model ranking. Average monthly sales stood at 2,143.

Since December 2010, Nissan sold in Japan 115,141 LEAFs.

Nissan LEAF sales in Japan – December 2018

Nissan LEAF and Nissan LEAF e+ offer in Japan

The year 2019 promises to be exciting as the 62 kWh version LEAF e+ will go on sale early in Japan. With such a big battery and nationwide CHAdeMO network, LEAF should sell like hot cakes, especially since the 40 kWh still will be available.

The e+ costs around 14% more than the corresponding 40 kWh LEAF (e+ X trim vs. X trim), while the difference compared to the base S is 28%.


Source: Electric Vehicle News

Nissan LEAF NISMO RC & IMx KURO Show Up At CES: Video

Nissan shows three EVs at CES.

The LEAF e+ was not the only Nissan‘s EV at the 2019 CES in Las Vegas – the other two are LEAF NISMO RC and IMx KURO concept.

The Nissan LEAF NISMO RC is a proper racing car, based on the second-generation LEAF.  With more than double the maximum power and torque output of its predecessor, this is one hot electric machine. Sadly, Nissan won’t sell this car to the public.

“With dual electric motors, advanced battery technology, all-wheel drive capability and an aggressive, restyled body shape, the purpose-built car represents the pinnacle of electric power. The two electric motors, at opposite ends of the chassis, manage power independently to each axle. The motors produce 240 kilowatts combined (120 kW each) and an astounding 640 Nm of instant torque to the wheels. A new all-wheel-drive system gives the LEAF NISMO RC its outstanding cornering prowess.

A long hood and Nissan’s signature V-motion grille highlight the totally restyled front end. The distinctive silver-and-black paint scheme with NISMO red accents – similar to the Nissan Formula E car – make the LEAF NISMO RC seem like it’s in constant motion, even when sitting still at the starting line.”

Nissan LEAF NISMO RC specs:

  • 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.4 seconds
  • battery capacity: undisclosed
  • dual motor all-wheel drive
  • system output: 240 kW (2x 120 kW) and 640 Nm of torque
  • curb weight: 1,220 kg
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The IMx KURO, on the other hand, is a concept all-electric, long-range crossover. We are all waiting on the production SUV/crossover from Nissan.

Nissan IMx quick specs:

  • up to 600 km (373 miles) of range in JC08 (which means about 225 miles/360 km translated to real world/EPA driving)
  • double-motor all-wheel drive – 320 kW and 700 Nm of system output
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Source: Electric Vehicle News

The Hill Contributor Claims Electric Car Tax Credits Benefit The ‘Elite’

The author also incorrectly states that electric vehicles are no cleaner than diesel.

Colter Devries, opinion contributor to The Hill, recently penned a piece attacking the federal EV tax credit, and the environmental benefits of driving electric. Of course, because that was not enough, he also felt the need to turn his frustration toward “West Coast elites” and “corporate conglomerates”.

As expected, there are many important points that the author is either unaware of or is deliberately withholding.

First off is Devries’ claim that the tax credit is just a special interest cash grab:

Over the last two years, the Republican Congress has secured provisions that are expanding and growing our national economy better than ever before. However, a proposed expansion on a special interest provision could disrupt our fiscal progress and threaten the free market.

We need to extinguish the notion that our government will keep handing out dollars to pad the pockets of West Coast elites and stand behind the backbone of the American way of life.

The federal government is not “handing out dollars” to special interest groups. Instead, it is allowing Americans to keep more of the taxable income they earned. The idea that reducing the tax burden of Americans is a negative runs counter to the author’s praise for congressional Republicans.

The tax credit allows more Americans to make the transition to electric vehicles.

Secondly, Devries floats the idea that only the very wealthy benefit from the tax credit:

In fact, the majority of credits are claimed by those earning at least $100,000 annually.

This is incredibly misleading. The author cites a study by the Congressional Research Service. This states that in 2016, 57,066 individual taxpayers claimed $375 million in plug-in vehicle tax credits. Of these filers, 78% have an adjusted gross income of $100,000 or more.

However, InsideEVs estimates that 158,614 plug-in vehicles were sold in 2016. Why the discrepancy? This is because the vast majority of electric vehicles in 2016 were leased.

In this situation, leasing companies claim the $7,500 tax credit. The tax credit is then almost always applied directly or indirectly to reduce monthly lease payments. As a result, lease rates are typically in the same ballpark (or lower) than equivalent ICE vehicle leases.

This is appealing to many middle class buyers for a variety of reasons. The buyer is able to see an immediate reduction in their monthly payment rather than waiting until tax filing season to receive a full or partial tax credit. Secondly, EV tech is rapidly improving. Leasing allows buyers to drive for 3 or 4 years, then move on to the next generation of electrics.

When the vehicle is turned in at the end of a lease, the car hits the used market at a reduced price. Because a used electric car is no longer eligible for the $7,500 tax credit, dealers price it factoring in the full credit. Otherwise, purchasing new would be more cost effective over used. Because of this, middle class and lower middle class buyers can affordably finance a used EV or PHEV. It is not simply the wealthy who benefit.

Electric vehicles are becoming cleaner every year.

Electric vehicles are in fact cleaner than diesels.

Lastly, the author claims that electric vehicles are no cleaner than diesels but is proven false by his own source:

Global warming potential benefits are typically only 9-14-percent better than gasoline vehicles, about the same as diesel. Most electricity used to fuel EVs are generated by coal, and likely may not even reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

In order to make this claim, the author sources research published in 2012. The quoted 9% – 14% global warming potential (GWP) benefit assumes a mere 100,000 km (62,137 miles) vehicle lifetime. The same study suggests that a vehicle lifetime of 200,000 km (124,274 miles) results in a GWP benefit of 27% to 29% relative to gasoline and 17% to 20% to diesel. A modern electric such as the Chevy Bolt EV or the Tesla Model 3 should well exceed 100,000 miles.

The analysis takes into account “electricity source, use phase energy consumption, vehicle lifetime, and battery replacement schedules” as well as increased consumption for the production of EVs compared to traditional ICE vehicles. Energy usage was based on “present European electricity mix” circa 2012. This factor has drastically changed over the past 6 years.

While Mr Devries says most electricity is generated by coal, this is not the case in the United States. Nations are leaving coal for natural gas and renewable energy sources. Coal makes up a tiny fraction of production in California and New York. Even in Texas, wind has now surpassed coal in generating capacity. All three states topped new EV registrations in the U.S. last year.

But no matter where you live in the U.S., our electric grid is getting cleaner every year. Despite naysayers, the economic and environmental benefits of electric vehicles are clear. Hopefully soon, we can soon put these debates behind us.

Source: The Hill


Source: Electric Vehicle News